Opening Hours

House, galleries, café and shop:

Monday: Closed
Tuesday: Closed
Wednesday: 11am – 5pm
Thursday: 11am – 5pm
Friday: 11am – 5pm
Saturday: 11am – 5pm
Sunday: 11am – 5pm

Access Information & Contact Us

Find access information here. 

+44 (0)1223 748 100
mail@kettlesyard.cam.ac.uk

 

Kettle’s Yard News

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For our latest blogs click here

Find out What’s On at Kettle’s Yard here.

Welcome to Kettle's Yard

Book your visit

Kettle's Yard is open Wednesday - Sunday, 11am - 5pm. You will need to book a free, timed ticket to visit.

Book your visit here

UNTITLED: Art on the conditions of our time

10 July - 3 October 2021

Find out more here

Donate

Admission is free, but we need your support more than ever so please consider donating.

Donate now

Shop & Café

The shop and cafe are open Wednesday - Sunday, 11am - 5pm. You will not need to book a ticket to visit but may have to queue during busy periods. The online shop is open.

Shop now

Stay Connected

📢 STUDENT CALL OUT 📢 To coincide with the artist Sutapa Biswas’ solo exhibition 'Lumen' at Kettle’s Yard from 16 October 2021–30 January 2022, apply to be part of this new student reading group. The group will meet four times to discuss questions that emerge from feminist and anti-racist artworks Biswas produced as a student at Leeds University in the early 1980s. Find out more and apply now by clicking the 'Kali Student Reading Group' link in our bio. Applications are open for current undergraduate or post-grad MA students. Applications close 30 September. @alinakhakoo @lowlamichelle @hummingbird_biswas @cambridgeuniversity @camunivmuseums @angliaruskin Image: Sutapa Biswas, Kali , 1989–90, Video, projection, colour and sound (stereo). 36 minutes, 19 seconds; 25 minutes, 28 seconds. Photo © Tate. © Sutapa Biswas.

🎶 CHAMBER MUSIC IS BACK! 🎶 We are delighted to announce the return of Chamber Music to Kettle’s Yard. Concerts will begin on Thursday 21 October and run on Thursdays during term time. After a long time without live music, we are thrilled to be hosting an exciting line-up of performers, including familiar faces, as well as some who are new to Kettle’s Yard. Click the link in our bio to see the full programme and book your tickets. @cambridgeuniversity @camunivmuseums 📸: @mylinhlephotography

We are pleased to announce two new events organised by the Friends of Kettle's Yard. Become a member of the Friends to join us for: 👨‍🎨 10 October: Artist Tim Crawley Studio Visit 🇯🇵 9 November: 'Rock glazed ceramics in Japan' talk with Matthew Blakely Find out more at www.kettlesyard.co.uk/friendsevents or visit the link in our bio and click 'What's On'. Image: Matthew Blakely

Tickets to visit the Kettle's Yard House have now been released until the end of January 2022. Visit the link in our bio to book your visit now. 🌿 You can also now book tickets for our upcoming exhibition 'Sutapa Biswas: Lumen', 16 October 2021 - 30 January 2022.

Happy Sunday! We’re sharing this beautiful photograph of the downstairs extension, taken by @oliviabennett_studio. Share your photos with us by tagging us or using #KettlesYard.

🌟 LAST CHANCE 🌟to enjoy two films by #UNTITLED artist NT in this special online film screening. 'Fox' and 'Mel's Lament' will be available to watch on our website until 15 September. 'Fox' is a 2-channel video installation exploring parallels between representations of the urban fox and that of ‘urban’ youth. The film deals with relationships – that of a young boy and a fox, and the boy’s interaction with his nocturnal urban environment. Filmed at night when the urban fox is most active and visible, the film focuses on the young boy’s nocturnal life, his interaction with his environment, and his association with the urban fox. 'Mel's Lament' (2017) is a modern-day interpretation of the story from Greek mythology of Philomela (or Philomel), who is raped and mutilated by her older sister’s husband Tereus. Philomel exacts her revenge on Tereus, the Greek gods take pity on her, and so that she can flee his wrath she is turned into a nightingale. The nightingale song which is sung once Philomel is a bird is often referred to as a lament. Click the link in our bio to watch both films.