Opening Hours

Café, galleries and shop: Tuesday – Sunday 11am – 5pm

House: Tuesday – Sunday 12  – 5pm

Free, timed entry tickets to the House are available at the information desk on arrival or online here.

Last entry to the House is at 4.30pm

Access Information & Contact Us

Find access information here. 

+44 (0)1223 748 100
mail@kettlesyard.cam.ac.uk

 

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Find out What’s On at Kettle’s Yard here.

A New Online Resource for Kettle’s Yard

Lucy Wheeler, Assistant Education Officer

The Kettle’s Yard learning team are delighted to announce the launch of A Handful of Objects – a new online resource for Kettle’s Yard. A Handful of Objects allows the opportunity to explore 5 key objects from the collection online through film, sound, images and 360-degree views. There is also bite-size information and helpful glossaries to deconstruct and break down art terminology. Whether you are a new to the Kettle’s Yard or a regular visitor who would like to hear more we hope the resource provides an enjoyable means to explore the collection.

Handful of Objects has been designed for adults who have an interest in art, but wouldn’t consider themselves specialists – but we hope that others will also find the resource useful too. In order for us to pitch the information and design of the resource to our target audience, we first met with our User Group – an advisory group made up of teachers, workshop participants, young people, Friends of Kettle’s Yard and youth workers. We discussed with the User Group how we might best present information in the most accessible and enjoyable way. A key topic of this meeting was how often prior knowledge is assumed. Taking this on board, we decided to make the resource question-led, including a question asking ‘why is it special’ – to really consider why each work was important. We have also included an option to read more about key art terminology and definitions, highlighted throughout the text.

A further discussion revolved around how the physical making of an artwork is so fascinating and often not fully disclosed. In the case of Lucie Rie’s ceramics, we wanted to try and tell the full story of the process of making – how do you go from a lump of clay to a beautifully glazed artwork? Bringing together sound-clips from local potter Rachel Dormor describing how to make pots on a wheel, images of Rie making pots and pictures of her glaze recipes from sketchbooks we hope we have provided some insight into the process of making.

We are also really excited to include high quality, large images in the resource and a zoom function to see artists’ techniques close up. A 360-degree carousel is also available, allowing the chance to see sculptures and ceramics in the round.

Throughout the resource there are options for you to share information and images through facebook and twitter – we would love to know why you think the artworks are special, so please do tweet us your thoughts. There is also a short survey on the site, which we would appreciate you filling out to help us find out who is using the resource and what they thought of it.

Click here to start exploring a Handful of Objects

This project was funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund.