Opening Hours

House, galleries, café and shop: Wednesday – Sunday 11am – 5pm

Free, timed entry tickets to the House and galleries are available here.

Last entry to the House is at 4.20pm

Access Information & Contact Us

Find access information here. 

+44 (0)1223 748 100
mail@kettlesyard.cam.ac.uk

 

Kettle’s Yard News

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For our latest blogs click here

Find out What’s On at Kettle’s Yard here.

The Invigilators blog

This is what you might find in Kettle’s Yard if you are lucky enough to visit us on a clear day. Low and sheer walls of light slide through the house, cutting the rooms into pieces, and transforming the space into a moving collage of light.

A hanging lens rotates gently.


Seen from the side it has become a flecked gemstone – beautifully flawed and intricate.

Compare this with George Kennethson’s alabaster carving: it isn’t transparent like the lens, but still preserves the hidden structure and intricacies of the material. His sculpture evokes a desert monolith when viewed in direct sun.

 

 

In fact, it almost emits its own mysterious light. You can imagine pulling a blind over the window and for a moment this inner glow remains.
Maitec’s wood carving, on the other hand, doesn’t let any light in (or out); the holes almost make up for this though, and seen from the right angle it too can shine.

 

Turn your head and the shadow cast by the same sculpture is a rare enough treat – and always combines with the Ben Nicholson above – but try and get a glimpse of this fleeting moment.

 

A sunbeam catches the filament of a passing cloud, and just before the cloud obscures it completely, the edges of the projection are momentarily diffused. Multiple angles are overlayed in shadow – the light has split the image.

 

Patterns emerge in other, unexpected, ways. Looking through a glass ball you can see an empty miniature-frame which once held a Rembrandt.

 

Multiplied by the air bubbles it is miniaturised further.

 

So come and chase shadows in the house, whether you’re are a first time visitor or an old hand, but be quick before dull Spring crashes the party.

~ Tom Noblett

Tom works in the house every Wednesday and Friday. Drop in between 2-4pm on a sunny day and he will show you where to find the best shadows.