Opening Hours

Café, galleries and shop: Tuesday – Sunday 11am – 5pm

House: Tuesday – Sunday 12  – 5pm

Free, timed entry tickets to the House are available at the information desk on arrival or online here.

Last entry to the House is at 4.30pm

Access Information & Contact Us

Find access information here. 

+44 (0)1223 748 100
mail@kettlesyard.cam.ac.uk

 

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Find out What’s On at Kettle’s Yard here.

3 December 2019, 3 – 6pm

Artist Nikhil Chopra will perform Rouge, a durational live action drawing.

Following the performance Nikhil Chopra will be in conversation with Catherine Wood, Senior Curator, International Art (Performance), Tate Modern.

FREE, come along

About Nikhil Chopra

Nikhil Chopra trained at the Faculty of Fine Arts in Baroda before continuing his studies in the United States. His work toes the line between performance, theatre, live art, sculpture, photography and drawing, often in the form of largely improvised and durational performances with large-scale drawings and props left as remnants. Chopra frequently addresses issues of identity, autobiography and the disparity between urban and rural landscapes in colonial and postcolonial contexts. For instance, in 2009–10, he performed under the persona of Yog Raj Chitrakar, a fictitious landscape painter based on the artist’s grandfather. In his own words, the artist’s performance as Chitrakar, which translates from Hindi as ‘picture-maker’, enabled him to explore personal memories and collective histories of being ‘hung over by the nostalgia for the British Raj yet reeling in the success of the Indian freedom struggle’.

About Homelands

Through photography, sculpture, painting, performance and film, ‘Homelands’ tells stories of migration and resettlement in South Asia and beyond, as well as violent division and unexpected connections. The exhibition engages with displacement and the transitory notion of home in a region marked by the repercussions of the Partition of India and Pakistan in 1947, and the independence of Bangladesh in 1971, as well as by contemporary migration. The artists explore intimate and political histories, often contesting borders, questioning common pasts and imagining new futures.

Access

The galleries are fully accessible. They are situated on the ground floor and can be accessed by stairs or a ramp from the entrance area.